Organic Farming

Blue Corn? Cinnamon-Flavoured Tulsi? This Farmer Has a Collection of 560 Varieties of Rare Seeds!

Dr. Rao started Hariyalee seeds, a “family-run farm, which curates species of endangered and heirloom seeds from all over the world” and sells them.

Bamboo Shoots, Herbal Tea & a Love Story: This Organic Retreat in Sikkim Has It All

Almost 20 years ago, when a young Swiss student made her way to the Tibetan Buddhism Centre in San Francisco, little did she know that her life was going to be altered forever. Helen Kamph, then in her mid-twenties, had already spent a year volunteering at SEMCOL in Ladakh while falling in love with India and its many mysteries. Naturally, when she met Topgay Tapaka, a young Sikkimese man at the Centre, they hit it off instantly.

Poison on our Plate | Ramanjaneyulu GV | TEDxHyderabad

Is our food safe? A red alert question that Ramanjaneyulu, puts out to all of us. Hear him talk about the quality of food we are eating.
Is our food safe? A red alert question that Ramanjaneyulu, puts out to all of us. Hear him talk about the quality of food we are eating.

Is our food safe? A red alert question that Ramanjaneyulu, puts out to all of us. Hear him talk about the quality of food we are eating. Listen to the reasons we need to adapt to organic farming as a results of excessive use of chemical pesticides and horrifying facts and statistics, surrounding them. He alerts us to the damage we are doing to our ecological footprints. In his heart wrenching talk, Ramanjaneyulu, highlights the plight of farmers and the reasons they commit suicide and the many reasons that farmers and farming should not die. 

Case Study: Robin Naiding Karbi Anglong, Assam

Rolf von Bueren, LADV, Thailand presents the Food for Future Award to Robin Naiding from Karbi Anglong, Assam

Realising the importance of natural resource management, Mr. Robin Naiding have encouraged and sensitised the village community of Bagadima comprising 42 households in Assam to create less pressure on forest cover and make the best use of land and its resources in a sustainable manner. He have promoted horticulture crops such as litchi, mango, banana, and parkia in his village with organic management of soil fertility and used cover crops to reduce weed growth and soil erosion. Under the leadership of Mr.

Case Study: K. M. BUJARBARUAH

K. M. BUJARBARUAH Recipient of Food for the Future Awards, 2015 - Assam

Dr. K. M. Bujarbaruah is the Vice Chancellor of Assam Agricultural University and he is also a well-known Scientist and Academic with experience as the Principal Scientist and Joint Director of Nagaland Centre, Director of Research Centre on Mithun (Nagaland),
Ocer-on-Special Duty for NRC on Swine, (Guwahati, Assam), Director of ICAR Research Complex for Northeastern Hill Region, (Barapani, Meghalaya) and Deputy Director General (Animal Sciences), ICAR (New Delhi) in the past. He was also the National Facilitator

Case Study: NEELAM DUTTA

Neelam Dutta (right) receiving the prestigious Haladhar Organic Farmer Award, 2014 from the Union Agriculture Minister

Lakshmi Agriculture Multipurpose Project (LAMP) is a composite farm established way back in 1978-79 by late Dr. Hemen Dutta. It is situated in the village of Pabhoi in Sonitpur district of Assam covering around 12 hectares of land. Various farming activities like scientic sheries, sh seed eco-hatchery and indigenous breeding of local sh varieties as well as ornamental shes, takes place at LAMP. Neelam Dutta, the proprietor of LAMP, works on the motive of increasing productivity, availability and aordability of agricultural products.

Organic farms help Thailand welcome cranes lost for 50 years

In this Friday, Nov 4, 2016, photo, animal scientists Tanat Uttaraviset, left, and Natawut Wanna, wear crane suits as they carry a sarus crane to be released into the wild at a wetland acclimating center in Buriram, Thailand. The tallest flying birds in the world, 70 incubator-hatched, hand-fed sarus cranes have been raised and released over the past five years in Thailand’s farm-rich northeast province of Buriram, whooping their startling two-toned song at dawn. (Gemunu Amarasinghe/Associated Press) By Mar

 A fuzzy-headed baby sarus crane hatched on a rural farm this fall offers a glimmer of hope for wildlife conservationists, organic farming advocates and a nation grieving after the death of their beloved king. That’s because this chubby chick named Rice is the first of its auspicious species to survive after hatching in the wild in Thailand in 50 years.

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